Review Blog

Oct 01 2018

A boy called BAT by Elana K. Arnold

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Ill. by Charles Santose. Walden Pond, 2018. ISBN 9780062445834
Highly recommended. Bixby Alexander Tam, known to those who know him as BAT because of his initials, his love of animals and the way his arms and hands flap when he gets excited, prefers life to be logical, predictable, routine and without surprises. He's not good with noise (so wears his sister Janie's earmuffs often), doesn't like the mushy texture of some foods, is sensitive to the feel of fabrics on his skin and finds it difficult to make eye contact and hold casual conversations. Clearly, to even a non-teacher who doesn't know the signs of being on the autism spectrum, this is a little boy with special needs. But Bat is not unhappy or frustrated - his mum, sister and teacher are sensitive to his needs, his peers seem to accept him for who he is, and although his father, whom he stays with "every-other-Friday" seems to struggle a little with his non-sporty son, generally Bat is content and just gets on with things. But when his mum, a vet, brings home a newborn skunk that needs special care, Bat comes into his own, devoting his life to caring for the kit and planning how he will be able to keep it and care for it beyond the initial few weeks before the local wildlife refuge can take over. He needs to show his mum that he is responsible and committed enough, even contacting a skunk expert for advice.
This is an engaging story that shows the reader the world through Bat's eyes but which is not patronising, sentimental or emotional. Bat's autism adds a different and interesting perspective to the relationships between the characters but the concept of an eight-year-old taking care of an orphaned animal and hoping to keep it longer is a story that could be about any young person. I believe that all children should be able to read about themselves in stories, and those about autistic children are rare, so this one which has such a solid, familiar storyline so every reader can relate to it while learning about the world through unfamiliar eyes, is a must-have.
Its sequel Bat and the Waiting Game is also available in hardcover.
Barbara Braxton

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