Review Blog

Jul 28 2014

Friday Barnes 1: Girl Detective by R. A. Spratt

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Random House Australia Children's, 2014. ISBN: 9781742759623.
(Age: 10+) No doubt you would all be familiar with the wonderful world of Nanny Piggins. Now R. A. Spratt introduces us to a new character, Friday Barnes, who I am certain will prove every bit as popular as the porcine prima donna.
Friday Barnes is a Matilda-esque child, thoroughly neglected by her remote scientific parents - the surprise and unplanned child after a neatly organised delivery of four older siblings. Left basically to her own devices for eleven years, Friday is an exceptionally intelligent girl who has read everything she can lay her hands on (starting with all the scientific texts which are the only reading matter in her house). Her only respite from the remoteness of her parents and her carefully camouflaged presence at school is the weekly contact with her Uncle Bernie, an insurance investigator.
When Uncle Bernie is faced with a terrible investigation (the theft of a diamond necklace worth squillions) that seems unsolvable, Friday decides he needs her help and with the resourcefulness of her own clever brain plus the help of her fictional hero, the great Poirot, Friday reveals the culprit and earns herself a huge reward.
Friday is not a mercenary child but the reward money solves her own problem - where to go to high school (since the university turned her down though she blitzed the entrance exam - apparently they weren't prepared to take on a 11 year old student!). She promptly pays her fees for the most exclusive school in the country, Highcrest Academy, figuring that attending a school which operates on a profit margin, it will at least be easier to bribe her way out of sporting events.
What Friday does not count on is that far from being anonymous at Highcrest, she suddenly finds herself investigating problems from missing homework to wildlife smuggling as well as dealing with some of the nastier pupils.
While Friday still hasn't figured out the point of high school, she has gained her first friends ever and solved some very tricky mysteries - just by being herself.
Readers, particularly girls, of about 10 plus will greatly enjoy this fun read.
Sue Warren

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